1
H
.
 1
D
.

Advertisement

Chemical Elements

A Virtual Museum

© Jumk.de Webprojects | Imprint & Privacy
Chemical Calculators | Atomic Collider Simulation
 2
He
.
 3
Li
...
 4
Be
...
 5
B
...
 6
C
...
 7
N
.
 8
O
.
 9
F
.
 10
Ne
.
 11
Na
...
 12
Mg
...
 13
Al
...
 14
Si
...
 15
P
...
 16
S
...
 17
Cl
.
 18
Ar
.
 19
K
...
 20
Ca
...
 21
Sc
...
 22
Ti
...
 23
V
...
 24
Cr
...
 25
Mn
...
 26
Fe
...
 27
Co
...
 28
Ni
...
 29
Cu
...
 30
Zn
...
 31
Ga
...
 32
Ge
...
 33
As
...
 34
Se
...
 35
Br
..
 36
Kr
.
 37
Rb
...
 38
Sr
...
 39
Y
...
 40
Zr
...
 41
Nb
...
 42
Mo
...
 43
Tc
...
 44
Ru
...
 45
Rh
...
 46
Pd
...
 47
Ag
...
 48
Cd
...
 49
In
...
 50
Sn
...
 51
Sb
...
 52
Te
...
 53
I
...
 54
Xe
.
 55
Cs
...
 56
Ba
...
 57-71
La-Lu

 72
Hf
...
 73
Ta
...
 74
W
...
 75
Re
...
 76
Os
...
 77
Ir
...
 78
Pt
...
 79
Au
...
 80
Hg
..
 81
Tl
...
 82
Pb
...
 83
Bi
...
 84
Po
...
 85
At
...
 86
Rn
.
 87
Fr
...
 88
Ra
...
 89-103
Ac-Lr

 104
Rf

 105
Db

 106
Sg

 107
Bh

 108
Hs

 109
Mt

 110
Ds

 111
Rg

 112
Cn

 113
Nh

 114
Fl

 115
Mc

 116
Lv

 117
Ts

 118
Og

Home | Random
All, All2, Mosaic
Concentration game
Knowledge
Element properties
Records, Archives
 57
La
...
 58
Ce
...
 59
Pr
...
 60
Nd
...
 61
Pm
...
 62
Sm
...
 63
Eu
...
 64
Gd
...
 65
Tb
...
 66
Dy
...
 67
Ho
...
 68
Er
...
 69
Tm
...
 70
Yb
...
 71
Lu
...
Islands of Stability
 89
Ac
...
 90
Th
...
 91
Pa
...
 92
U
...
 93
Np
...
 94
Pu
...
 95
Am
...
 96
Cm
...
 97
Bk
...
 98
Cf
...
 99
Es
...
 100
Fm
...
 101
Md
...
 102
No
...
 103
Lr

 Particle Zoo | Advertisement

    9    

9 F Fluorine

Halogen, nonmetal, mass: 18.998 u, 1 stable isotope (19), abundance rank (earth/space): 18/22

Click image to magnify. Natural fluorite, stained by impurities, 15 grams. Original size in cm: 2.5 x 3.5
Fluorite Fluorite mineral
Fluorine is the most chemically aggressive element. In pure form it is a pale, yellow-green F2 gas. It is extremely toxic and reacts with nearly everything, in most cases very violently. At contact with water, it forms the very caustic hydrofluoric acid, HF. Its salts (fluorides), especially fluorite (calcium fluoride, CaF2), which is shown here, frequently occur in nature as minerals. Fluoride is needed for bones and teeth, but quickly becomes poisonous if the dose is too high.

Fluorites gave the phenomenon fluorescence its name. Thereby, light is absorbed, then emitted with another (mostly longer) wavelength. Responsible isn't the fluorite itself, but inclusions of some lanthanoids and transition metals.
Fluorite with eurpoium Fluorite fluorescing blue
Another fluorite, 25 grams, 3 x 3.5 cm. Inclusions of europium2+ give it a purple color (left) and let it fluoresce blue under UV light (right).

Fluorine gas
Fluorine gas, but only as photomontage, because fluorine reacts even with glass. It could look like that (under a high pressure, otherwise fluorine is nearly colorless), before it would corrode the glass and the gas would be used up.


Advertisement


The images are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License, unless otherwise noted. Attribution by linking (outside of the internet credit with url) to the according element page.



Share:


 


Advertisement